Humanity Needs Dreamers: A Visit With Marie Curie

A production by Jen Myronuk and Susan Marie Frontczak

Marie Curie Living History A Project of Filmmakers Collaborative

About this project:

PRODUCER: Jen Myronuk

What if you could time travel to 1915 Paris and meet one of the world's greatest scientists?

Two-time Nobel Prize winner Marie Skłodowska-Curie is best known for the discovery of radioactivity — including the first successful treatment for cancer — but few understand the obstacles she faced just to get into the laboratory.

Through broadcast film productions of two acclaimed living history theatrical plays — Humanity Needs Dreamers: A Visit with Marie Curie (45 mins) & Manya: The Living History of Marie Curie (105 mins) — audiences of all ages are invited to experience Marie's remarkable journey from her childhood in Poland through groundbreaking research in France and further international prominence.

Artfully portrayed by living history scholar & playwright, Susan Marie Frontczak, Marie Curie Living History explores the tenacity of the human spirit and the enduring allure of scientific discovery.

Marie Curie Living History is part of STEM on Stage — a STEAM initiative to promote a greater interest in narrative science through film, live theater & interactive media.

Produced by Jen Myronuk & Susan Marie Frontczak.

Testimonials

"A very empathetic and poignant vision of the person, the woman, and the scientist Madame Curie. With both humor and sharp observations, Frontczak creates Marie Curie's universe." ~Gertie Skaarup, Niels Bohr Institute


"Scientists in the audience applaud the accuracy of the presentation, while the non- scientists rejoice at the accessibility of Manya's scientific descriptions." ~The American Museum of Science and Energy, Oak Ridge, TN


"Susan Marie's performance as Marie Curie was just wonderful. The perfect ending to the conference. I love the fact that it shows everyone that scientists are real people with real lives, making famous scientists relatable when they may have previously been seen as names in front of constants or formulas." ~California STEM Learning Network Summit 2015